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Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth

African-American Youth and Alcohol Advertising

Prevalence and consequences of underage drinking among African-American youth:

Exposure of African-American young people to alcohol advertising in 2004:

In magazines:

On the radio:

On television:

Alcohol marketing and the African-American community:

Updated June 2006. NSDUH data updated January 2012 (Reference 2).


Notes

  1. J.M. Wallace Jr. et al., "The Epidemiology of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use among Black Youth," Journal of Studies on Alcohol 60 (1999): 800-809.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-41, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 11-4658. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2011.
  3. Mulia N, Ye Y, Greenfield TK, Semore SE. Disparities in alcohol-related problems among white, black, and Hispanic Americans. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2009;33(4):654-662
  4. R. Caetano and C.L. Clark, "Trends in alcohol consumption patterns among Whites, Blacks and Hispanics: 1984 and 1995," Journal of Studies on Alcohol 59 (1998): 659-668.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) [online]. (2007) [cited 2012 Oct 16]. Available from URL: www.cdc.gov/ncipc/wisqars
  6. Simmons Market Research Bureau Adult Fall 2004 and Teen 2004 National Consumer Surveys.
  7. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising, 2008 and 2009. Baltimore, MD: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2012, 5.
  8. Ibid., 5..
  9. Ibid., 5.
  10. Ibid., 5.
  11. Ibid., 5.
  12. Personal People Meter (PPM) technology uses inaudible codes embedded in radio signals that precisely identify the station and date and time of listening along with demographic information about the survey participant. PPMs are gradually replacing paper diaries, which require the participant to recall and record listening in 15-minute increments. Where paper diaries were distributed twice or four times per year for 12-week surveys, PPMs provide continuous monitoring.
  13. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising, 2008 and 2009. Baltimore, MD: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2012, 7.
  14. Ibid., 7.
  15. Ibid., 7.
  16. Ibid., 10.
  17. Ibid., 8.
  18. Ibid., 9.
  19. Ibid., 10.
  20. See e.g., D. Jernigan and P. Wright, eds., Making News, Changing Policy: Using Media Advocacy to Change Alcohol and Tobacco Policy (Rockville, MD: Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 1994); B. Gallegos, Chasing the Frogs and Camels out of Los Angeles: The Movement to Limit Alcohol and Tobacco Billboards: A Case Study (San Rafael, CA: The Marin Institute for the Prevention of Alcohol and Other Drug Problems, 1999).
  21. See e.g., D. Jernigan and P. Wright, eds., Making News, Changing Policy: Using Media Advocacy to Change Alcohol and Tobacco Policy (Rockville, MD: Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 1994).
  22. D.F. Roberts et al., Substance Use in Popular Movies and Music (Rockville, MD: Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 1999).
  23. R.H. DuRant et al., "Tobacco and Alcohol Use Behaviors Portrayed in Music Videos: A Content Analysis," American Journal of Public Health 87, no. 7 (1997): 1131-1135.
  24. D. Herd, "Changes in the Prevalence of Alcohol Use in Rap Song Lyrics, 1979-1997," Addiction 100 (2005): 1258-69.