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Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth

Television, Alcohol Ads and Youth, 2001 to 2005

Television alcohol advertising from 2001 to 2005 resulted in alcoholic beverage advertising substantially exposing young people to their products.

Television is the primary medium for advertisers, and this also holds true for the advertisers of most leading alcoholic beverages. As shown in the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth's December 2006 report, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001 - 2005, alcohol companies spent $4.7 billion to place 1.4 million advertisements for alcoholic beverages on television from 2001 to 2005.

Nearly all youth watch television frequently:

Alcohol advertising on television—and youth exposure to it—grew dramatically between 2001 and 2005:

Teens' favorite television programs had alcohol advertising:

The industry's voluntary guidelines are inadequate:

The figure above shows that the trends in youth exposure (measured in gross rating points or GRPs) to alcohol ads in magazines and on television have moved in opposite directions since adoption of the 30% standard in September 2003. The result is that young people ages 12 to 20 saw as much alcohol advertising in these two media combined in 2005 as they did in 2001.13


Notes

  1. Teenage Research Unlimited, Spring 2005, Wave 45, 110-115.
  2. Teenage Research Unlimited, Spring 2005, Wave 45, 159-161.
  3. Teenage Research Unlimited, Spring 2005, Wave 45, 75-86.
  4. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005 (Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2006), 1.
  5. "More likely to see" or "more popular among" (as well as percentage measures of youth overexposure and other comparisons of adult and youth exposure to alcohol advertising in this report) are based on "gross rating points," an industry-standard measure of how much an audience segment is exposed to advertising per capita. Another way of measuring advertising exposure is "gross impressions" (the total number of times all members of a given audience are exposed to advertising). The adult population will almost always receive far more "gross impressions" than youth because there are far more adults in the population than youth. Gross rating points are calculated by dividing gross impressions by the relevant population (e.g. persons age 21+) and multiplying by 100, thereby leveling the measurement playing field for differently-sized population segments.
  6. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 2, 11.
  7. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 11.
  8. "Most popular" refers to the regularly scheduled programs with the largest teen audiences during a single representative week in each year. See report for methodology. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 16-17.
  9. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 17.
  10. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 13, 15-16.
  11. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001 to 2003: More of the Same (Washington, D.C.: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2004), 8.
  12. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 8.
  13. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 9.
  14. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 5.
  15. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Still Growing After All These Years: Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2005, 7.
  16. D.H. Jernigan et al., "Alcohol Advertising and Youth: A Measured Approach," Journal of Public Health Policy 26 (2005): 312-325.